Print Friendly, PDF & Email

TITOLO DEL WORKSHOP: European Code of Good Conduct for Microcredit Providers

COORDINATORE: Caroline Lentz - European Microfinance Network (EMN), Operations Manager, EaSI TA Senior Non Key Expert

RELATORI: Riccardo Aguglia - European Investment Fund (EIF), Senior Microfinance Investment Manager Aldo Moauro - Microfinanza Rating, Executive Director, EaSI TA KeySpeaker

A total of 45 participants, of which 26 men and 19 women, attended the Workshop about the European Code of Good Conduct for Microcredit Providers. The participants were asked a series of questions about their experience. The 73% of the participants (33 out of 45) filled the feedback form provided by the EMN.

They were asked to rate difference aspects:

1. General feeling about the workshop

2. Workshop content

3. Workshop material

4. Workshop Moderator & Panellists

5. Workshop organisation and venue

6. The match of the workshop with their needs

7. If they gained relevant knowledge and information

8. The ability to apply the knowledge and information in their work

9. The topics that would interest them the most for future workshops

On a sliding scale:

- 1 = POOR

- 2 = FAIR

- 3 = GOOD

- 4 = VERY GOOD

- 5 = EXCELLENT

Overall, the event has been evaluated by the participants as between good and very good, with an average score of 3.6 out of 5. This shows a high level of satisfaction among the participants, shown also by the high percentage of people evaluating it as excellent. The overall average score from the collected forms is 71%.

1. General feeling about the workshop 31 out of 33 participants (94%) described their general feeling about the workshop as good or very good, the other 6% thought it was excellent. This results in an average rating of 3,61 out of 5. Comments included statements such as “instructive and interesting” or “these are very interesting examples about real experiences”.

2. Workshop content The respondents were very satisfied with the content of the workshop, giving it an average rating of 3,82 out of 5, which is almost very good. 22 respondents (67%) rated the content as ‘very good’, 3 (9%) as excellent, 7 (21%) as good and one person as fair. The part on Microfinance Instruments was highlighted as being especially interesting in the comments.

3. Workshop material Not all the respondents were satisfied with the quality of the workshop material, although the rating average is more than good with 3,36 out of 5. 72% (12 respondents each) rated the material as ‘good’ or ‘very good’, 3 persons as excellent. 6 respondents (18%) were not very satisfied, rating the material as ‘fair’. In the comments, this view has been expressed with “very simple”.

4. Workshop Moderator & Panellists Most respondents were satisfied with the workshop moderator and panellists; resulting in the average rating of 3,82 out of 5 – almost very good. 21 % (7 participants) rated them as excellent, 42% (14 participants) as very good, 33% (11 participants) as good and one person as fair. The comments stressed that the moderator and panellists were “very prepared and concrete”.

5. Workshop organisation and venue Respondents rated the workshop organisation and venue between good and very good (3,57 average out of 5). 13 persons (39%) answered with ‘very good’, 10 (30%) with ‘good’, 4 (12%) with excellent; 2 (6%) with fair and 1 (3%) with poor.

6. The match of the workshop with their needs Overall, the respondents indicated that the workshop matched with their needs, 78% rated it as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ (13 persons each). For one person, the answer was excellent and 3 participants (9%) answered with ‘fair’.

7. If they gained relevant knowledge and information Most participants reported that they gained relevant knowledge and information during the workshop, the average was between good and very good (3,47 out of 5). 30% (10 persons) answered with ‘good’, 39% (13 persons) with ‘very good’, 9% (3 persons) with ‘excellent’, 9% with ‘fair’ and one person with ‘poor’. This results in a rating average of 3,47 out of 5, between good and very good.

8. The ability to apply the knowledge and information in their work Generally spoken, the average rating of this question was the lowest in the questionnaire (3,17 out of 5), which means the respondents still rated the applicability of the knowledge gained during the workshop in their work as ‘good’. While 11 respondents (33%) answered with ‘good’, 8 (24%) with ‘very good’ and 3 (9%) with excellent. Nevertheless, 5 persons (15%) rated it as ‘fair’ and 2 (6%) as ‘poor’.

9. The topics that would interest them the most for future workshops

11 persons answered this last question (30% of all respondents); proposing the following topics:

- More practical examples (suggestion of 2 respondents) yy Other real examples and I would like to see the difference between Italian banks and European banks

- Microfinance Instruments - Technical knowledge about assessment of loss and ranking - The risks of banks or enterprises that will run in the future in this context of new European rules

- Advisor role of the bank in the Microfinance world

- The role of the bank in the governance; the enterprise and risk sharing between public and private sector

- Innovative uses of Microfinance in order to help with the re-organization of business; not only for start-ups

- Economics

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

TITOLO DEL WORKSHOP: EaSI TA Workshop “A Comparative Analysis of Microcredit Legislation”

COORDINATORE: Maria Doiciu - Eurom-consultancy, Senior consultant, EaSI TA Non Key Expert
RELATORI: Eugenio Minucci - RITMI-PerMicro, Chief Operating Officer Martina Grigorova - SIS Credit, Head of Business Lending and Investor Relations EaSI TA Speaker

A total of 27 participants, of which 12 men and 15 women, attended the Workshop called “A comparative Analysis of Microcredit Legislation”. The participants were asked a series of questions about their experience. The 85% of the participants (23 out of 27) filled the feedback form provided by the EMN.

They were asked to rate difference aspects:

1. General feeling about the workshop

2. Workshop content

3. Workshop material

4. Workshop Moderator & Panellists

5. Workshop organisation and venue

6. The match of the workshop with their needs

7. If they gained relevant knowledge and information

8. The ability to apply the knowledge and information in their work

9. The topics that would interest them the most for future workshops

On a sliding scale:

- 1 = POOR

- 2 = FAIR

- 3 = GOOD

- 4 = VERY GOOD

- 5 = EXCELLENT

Overall, the event has been evaluated by the participants as almost very good, with an average score of 3.9 out of 5. This shows a high level of satisfaction among the participants, shown also by the high percentage of people evaluating it as or excellent. The overall average score from the collected forms was at 76,54%. 57% of the respondents (13 persons) described their general feeling about the workshop as ‘very good’, 17% (4 persons) as excellent and 26% ( 6 persons) as good. This results in an average rating of 3,9 out of 5, which means almost very good.

Comments:

- Interesting. It should be more useful to have an institutional point of view on Italian legislation as well to solve some interpretative issues.

- It’s a good initiative and it could be interesting to talk about other Microcredit legislation, next time to have an overall perspective.

- Not enough people attended

- I find it very interesting that less developed countries like Romania and Bulgaria have to experience to teach ‘us’ the Microcredit Pro’s and Con’s

Workshop content

The respondents were very satisfied with the content of the workshop, giving it an average rating of 4,13 out of 5 which means more than very good. 12 respondents (53%) rated the content as ‘very good’, 7 (30%) as excellent, and 4 (17%) as good. One participant outlined in the comments that the workshop content was “very informative”.

Workshop material

Overall, the respondents very satisfied with the workshop material; the average rating was 3,65 out of 5 – between good and very good. What can be seen is that while 22% rated it as ‘excellent’, 30% as ‘very good’ and 39% as ‘good’, 9% found that the workshop material was ‘fair’. They criticised that the “slides were not nice to see” and that the “visual presentation was very good but it always had quotes telling where the information had been taken from”. For the future, one participant suggested “more schemes and less words”.

Workshop Moderator & Panellists

Most respondents were very satisfied with the workshop moderator and panellists; resulting in the average rating of 3,74 out of 5. 22 % (5 participants) rated them as excellent, 30% (7 participants) as very good and 48% (11 participants) as good. In the comments, the “very good moderation” has been highlighted, but the “English of the Italian speakers could have been a little bit more fluent” and “someone from Germany/the UK would have helped a better comparison”.

Workshop organization and venue

Respondents rated the workshop organisation and venue between very good and excellent, with an average rating of 4,33 out of 5. 39% (9 respondents) answered with ‘excellent’, 43% (10 respondents) with ‘very good’ and 9% (2 respondents) with ‘good’. 2 persons did not answer the question.

The match of the workshop with their needs

Overall, the respondents indicated that the workshop matched with their needs (the average rating was 3,67 out of 5- between good and very good). 9 participants (39%) rated it as ‘good’, 7 participants (30%) as ‘very good’, 4 participants (17%) as ‘excellent’ and one person (4%) as ‘fair’. 2 persons did not answer the question. One person stated that he/she would have needed more panellists/opinions.

If they gained relevant knowledge and information

With an average rating of 3,91 out of 5, the participants rated gaining relevant knowledge and information during the workshop as very good. 57% (13 persons) answered with ‘very good’, 17% each answered with ‘good’ and ‘excellent’ (4 respondents each). One person rated the relevant knowledge as ‘fair’ and one person did not answer the question.

The ability to apply the knowledge and information in their work

Overall, the average rating of this question was the lowest in the questionnaire (3,27 out of 5), which means the respondents still rated the applicability of the knowledge gained during the workshop in their work as ‘good’. While 7 respondents (30%) answered with ‘very good’, 6 (26%) answered with ‘good’ and 3 (13%) with excellent, 5 persons (22%) rated it as ‘fair’ one person as poor. One person did not answer the question. One reason for this low average may be the fact that many of the participants were students. One of the comment support this interpretation, stating “not yet”.

The topics that would interest them the most for future workshops persons answered this last question (48% of all respondents); proposing the following topics:

- Evolution of European Legislation of Microfinance

- Microcredit concessions

- Social mission and economic sustainability

- The Microcredit culture of less developed countries

- Microfinance and Development

- Corporate social responsibility versus economic sustainability

- The Microfinance for PM - Real operation of Microfinance/Practical examples, less theory

- Any topic related to Eastern countries; in particular Bulgaria and Lithuania

- Microfinance risk assessment/scoring

- Social innovation Microcredit

OBSERVATIONS

Receptivity of the event by the target group:

- Development of registrations (and potential causes, if irregular): Registration process was managed by the National Agency of Microcredit (the host).

- Actions taken with regard to increase of receptivity (if applicable): Not needed

- Testimonials from participants collected by organisational team during the event: n/a

- Other insights collected by the organisational team in conversations with participants during the event (usefulness of event, preferred specific topics, ideas and topics for future fi-compass activities): The microfinance market in Italy is still very young and rather underdeveloped apart from one major player. It is still a challenge to get the market growing and maturing. The event attracted mostly students from the University in Rome, which is likely to be a result of the low level of involvement of Italian practitioners’ microfinance Network RITMI.

Format and content of the event:

- Participants’ response to the event format (e.g. how were presentations, case studies and group work perceived; has there been active participation in each of these sessions? What can be improved? How did the audience react to videos?): All the panellists of the workshops had brief Power Point presentations to support their interventions. Presentations are available in the annexe. The event lasted exactly the time foreseen for it (2 times 50 minutes). It started with some 5 minutes’ delay from the original agenda due to the delay in the previous presentation in Italian in order to increase receptivity. Some of the participants, mainly the students, were asking for more practical information in form of case studies. This would also had been the appropriate event format, however given the limited time of 50 minutes, such practical exercise was not realistic, further the venue (a theatre) was not favourable.

- Assessment of content and presentation skills of the speakers; and suitability for future events: The scoring in the evaluations from the speakers and the content of the workshop were above the average scoring of the session. The speakers were very efficient and addressing the point at every moment and with every question. The feedback says that the speakers and moderators were well prepared and concrete.

- Interest in fi-compass publications during the event (and recommendation for similar future events): leaflets from fi-compass and the EaSI TA project were distributed upon interest as well as some 4 copies of the EU Code of Good Conduct brochures.

Organizational issues (in bullet points):

- Scope of services (incl. atypical requests) done by the Consortium and the EIB, incl. division of work: This assignment was proposed and planned well ahead of time. The first discussions were lead between EMN, Ritmi and the National Agency in Q2 2016. The local organizers were very happy about EMN’s participation in the conference programme.

- Preparation of the event – what worked well and where is room for improvement: All panellists were absolutely collaborative and helpful in the event preparation and conduction. The same can be said also from the local organiser, although the expected level and quality of outreach was less than expected. The fact that the organiser was not agreeing on sharing the list of registration upfront did not help the preparation of the event to the target group.

- Event conduction - well and where is room for improvement Given the reduced time for presentation and the venue (theatre), there was no room for practical exercises. All speakers have well respected their given timeslot and were well prepared to deliver the workshop. The dynamic of the event was strongly impregnated by the student target group, although the contents were tailored to microcredit providers. This probably led to the fact that so few questions were asked, in addition to the presentations done in English without interpretation services into Italian.

- Follow-up – what worked well and where is room for improvement: The collaboration of the speakers and experts made that the workshop sessions were delivered well and everyone came well prepared. The participation from the audience was very limited. However, in between the workshops we have taken the chance to meet with a few potential interested parties in the EaSI TA programme. The local organiser, The Agency of Microcredit for Italy, has done a good job in the logistical preparation of the event and had very helpful staff to smoothen the implementation (microphone service, photographer, help with the roll-up banner, help with the PowerPoint presentation etc.). However, the target group and the number of participants were below expectation. Also, we would consider a collabo- workshops and the lunch time. Given that some of the speakers were Italian native, we chose to let them do the ration with the national network of Italian microcredit providers, RITMI, a true value for the next edition of this event. The level of discussion could be raised much to the benefits of the microcredit providers.

Recommendations/lessons learned:

- Workshops in pre-established events guarantee an excellent and efficient outreach at national level. Although in the present case, outreach could be improved if all the players in Italy would pull the strings together.

- Workshops remain a good tool for dissemination of good practices at EU level and the audience is generally interested in knowing how other countries deal with similar issues (e.g. legal frameworks)

- The workshop was an excellent presentation of the EaSI program in Italy. Some of the smaller MCPs in the country have shown interest to apply to the EaSI TA call.

Annexes
Annex 1 - Final Moderation scripts for specific sessions (where applicable): Available Annex 2 - Final programme document and agenda: Available Annex 3 - List of participants to the event (excel sheet “III EMF - Attendees List” provided by the host organisation) Annex 4 - List of participants to the 2 EaSI TA events (list of signatures and same excel sheet as above “III EMF - Attendees List” which includes information on attendance to the workshops + their respective email addresses): Available Annex 5 - Scanned evaluation forms (one pdf per workshop): Available Annex 6 - All presentations and workshop materials (ppt): Available Annex 7 – List of potential MCP candidates for the EaSI TA programme: Available Annex 8 – Published past events page on fi-compass website: Available
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

TITOLO DEL WORKSHOP: Housing prodotti per l’impresa

COORDINATORE: Irene Bertucci - Ente Nazionale per il Microcredito, Consiglio di Amministrazione
RELATORI: Lisa Petersen - Belong Italy, Direttore Antonio Perruzza - Confcooperative - Federabitazione, Direttore Luisa Mutti - Consiglio Nazionale Architetti, Consigliere Paolo Rita - Ente Nazionale per il Microcredito

ARGOMENTI

Modalità di intervento per il Microcredito sia sociale sia imprenditoriale nell’ambito dell’housing; proposta progettuale - il microcredito imprenditoriale per trasformare immobili fermi sul mercato in strutture microricettive; considerazioni sulla fattibilità di tali interventi al fine di riqualificare edifici obsoleti e per dare visibilità alle piccole eccellenze italiane; proposte per creare una rete di operatori specializzati, in grado di lanciare, diffondere e svolgere i progetti.

RESOCONTO

Panoramica delle varie form(ul)e di Microcredito

Durante il primo intervento sono state illustrate in dettaglio le possibili modalità di microcredito - sociale o imprenditoriale - applicato all’ampio campo dell’Housing. È stato illustrato inoltre il primo progetto per il microcredito nell’ambito dell’Housing, che risale al 2014. Questo progetto proponeva un prodotto finanziario di microcredito sociale, rivolto a chi si trovasse in difficoltà di affrontare le spese collegate alla prima casa (mutuo, affitti, manutenzione, efficientamento energetico, assicurazioni ed altre). Durante questo intervento introduttivo è stato sottolineato che il microcredito imprenditoriale invece si rivolge ad un bacino di utenti più ampio, in quanto non solo vuole essere uno strumento di risoluzione o di prevenzione di situazioni di emergenza e di emarginazione, ma vuole innanzitutto dare spazio a nuove idee ed a nuovi progetti imprenditoriali ritenuti sostenibili.

Presentazione della Proposta Progettuale

La nuova proposta progettuale per l’impiego del microcredito - per la prima volta quello imprenditoriale - nell’Housing suggerisce uno strumento finanziario studiato appositamente per proprietari o affittuari di un immobile (prima o seconda che casa), il quale desiderano trasformare in una struttura microricettiva, ossia Bed & Breakfast, affittacamere, casa vacanze ecc, per far fronte alle spese relative e/o per avviare un piccolo business. Il progetto parte da un’analisi del mercato mondiale del turismo, alimentato da alcune importanti tendenze nel mondo del viaggio: il turista di una volta è diventato un viaggiatore che cerca l’autenticità e sempre più spesso l’accoglienza diretta, originale e a dimensione di uomo: la richiesta per le strutture microricettive è in forte crescita. Questo fatto ci dà un’opportunità per contrastare l’attuale mercato immobiliare italiano in stallo, in quanto rappresenta la possibilità di trasformare un immobile fermo sul mercato in una fonte di guadagno = struttura microricettiva. Sono stati illustrati alcuni punti chiave riguardo l’adeguamento di un immobile ad attività microricettiva: anche se il regolamento edilizio da rispettare è ben più elastico rispetto al regolamento previsto per gli interventi edilizi sugli alberghi, ci sono dei parametri di cui tenere conto, dalle metrature minime agli spazi a disposizione degli ospiti e altri fattori ancora. Nel momento in cui un proprietario/affittuario di un immobile accederà al microcredito imprenditoriale destinato alla trasformazione del suo immobile in una struttura micro-ricettiva, tra gli interventi coperti potranno essere inclusi degli interventi edilizi di ristrutturazione e di adeguamento, le spese per i servizi di avvio e gestione, come anche dei corsi di formazione. Ogni gestore, al fine di poter avviare la propria struttura, deve presentare una SCIA allo SUAR (Sportello Unico Attività Ricettive), completa di una planimetria asseverata. Ciò significa che l’avvio di un’attività microricettiva richiede obbligatoriamente l’intervento di un tecnico abilitato. Ha voluto sottolineare il Consigliere del CNAPPC che la natura di questo progetto non solo andrà a stimolare il mercato lavorativo a favore del beneficiario diretto del microcredito concesso, ma anche il mercato lavorativo dei giovani architetti - una professione in forte crisi -, che in veste di tecnici indispensabili per realizzare le strutture diventeranno i beneficiari indiretti dell’iniziativa.

Obiettivi

In seguito alla presentazione della proposta progettuale sono stati stabiliti degli obiettivi a breve ed a lungo termine: 1. Impatto immediato del progetto: risoluzione o prevenzione di situazioni di emergenza e di emarginazione; stimolazione del mercato lavorativo 2. Impatto a medio/lungo termine: progressiva riqualificazione di immobili, borghi e centri storici inutilizzati; messa in regola di strutture abusive attraverso l’ufficializzazione delle stesse; visibilità per le eccellenze italiane all’estero, attraverso le piattaforme di promozione innovative e molto seguite, tipicamente utilizzate per le strutture microricettive.

Conclusione

Il mercato del turismo applicato al campo dell’Housing e dell’edilizia offre un’ampia varietà di possibili scenari da esplorare e da sfruttare. Di pari passo con lo sviluppo inarrestabile del settore microricettivo si stanno evolvendo anche le aspettative da parte degli ospiti: da strutture accessibili per i diversamente abili a strutture per i viaggiatori single con i figli piccoli, il mondo del viaggio sta esprimendo sempre nuove esigenze a cui la nostra offerta ricettiva dovrà poter rispondere. Il progetto presentato mira a tradurre le tendenze osservate in delle opportunità lavorative concrete, trasformando un peso in una risorsa, ossia veicolando un immobile fermo sul mercato come fonte di guadagno in momenti di necessità. Il workshop si è concluso con il proposito di avviare una rete operativa tra i vari partecipanti, al fine di dar vita all’iniziativa.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

TITOLO DEL WORKSHOP: La via italiana al microcredito

COORDINATORE: Marco Paoluzi - Responsabile Area Credito Ente Nazionale per il Microcredito
RELATORI: Diego Rizzato - Direttore generale Microcredito Italiano Spa Stefano Cocchieri - Head of soft loans contributions and subsides Unicredit Spa Guglielmo Belardi - Presidente del comitato di indirizzo del RTI, Gestore del Fondo di Garanzia per le Pmi Andrea Nardone - Segretario Generale di Fondazione Risorsa Donna

Sintesi Il Dott. Paoluzi, coordinatore del workshop, ha aperto la tavola rotonda illustrando il percorso compiuto fino ad oggi dal microcredito che ha assunto negli anni una diffusione ed un radicamento molto forte nel nostro paese. In particolare il microcredito imprenditoriale ha avuto un incremento notevole grazie alla garanzia del Fondo di Garanzia per le PMI che ha permesso agli istituti finanziari di esercitare questo strumento di finanza ordinaria come previsto dall’art. 111 TUB. L’obiettivo del tavolo è stato quello di invitare gli operatori presenti ad indicare i loro suggerimenti circa il funzionamento futuro del microcredito. Lo stesso coordinatore ha offerto due spunti di riflessione: innanzitutto, per il microcredito sociale, ravvisa la necessità di reperire una garanzia di natura pubblica al pari di quella prevista per quello imprenditoriale, prevista a sua volta dal Fondo di garanzia per le PMI. Uno dei percorsi possibili è valutare insieme con il Mef la possibilità di utilizzare le risorse stanziate per il Fondo di prevenzione antiusura. L’altra riflessione riguarda la necessità di reperire una garanzia sussidiaria a quella delle PMI al fine di poter includere finanziariamente anche coloro che i quali hanno conseguito delle segnalazioni nelle Centrali Rischi. Al momento i soggetti che hanno avuto un fallimento o una difficoltà nel loro percorso imprenditoriale sono i veri emarginati dal credito, mentre noi crediamo che si possa partire proprio da loro fornendo una seconda possibilità e capitalizzando il loro patrimonio di esperienza. Una soluzione di questo genere potrebbe essere individuata grazie al supporto di Cassa Depositi e Prestiti. Successivamente sono intervenuti nel seguente ordine: il Dott Belardi, il Dott. Cocchieri, il Dott. Rizzato ed infine il Dott. Nardone. Il Dott. Guglielmo Belardi ha fatto presente che, dopo una partenza lenta, dal 2015 c’è stato una escalation nelle prenotazioni al Fondo di Garanzia per le PMI grazie alla previsione anche per le banche di poter ricorrere alla prenotazione del Fondo. Ha, però, affermato che il microcredito è uno strumento migliorabile perché secondo la sua opinione sono riscontrabili due ordini di problemi. Il primo è che la normativa del 2014 ha ancora dei lati oscuri: i requisiti soggettivi del richiedente microcredito imprenditoriale sono difficili da accertare (L’art. 1 del Decreto del Ministero dell’Economia e delle Finanze n.176/2014 esclude che i finanziamenti possano essere concessi ad una impresa che al momento della richiesta presenti un livello di indebitamento superiore a 100.000 euro. Non è specificato, però, se l’indebitamento sia solo quello finanziario oppure anche commerciale. Il problema è che l’indebitamento commerciale si evince solo dal bilancio, che, non viene redatto nel caso di ditta individuale o libero professionista che, comunque, può accedere al microcredito. Discorso similare vale per il requisito dell’attivo patrimoniale, necessario per ottenere il finanziamento, che deve ammontare complessivamente per anno a 300.000 euro, nei tre esercizi antecedenti la data di richiesta di finanziamento o dall’inizio dell’attività se di durata inferiore -Disposizioni attuative del Decreto MEF n.176/2014-. Attivo patrimoniale che, sempre nel caso di una ditta individuale, non è riscontrabile in alcun modo in assenza di bilanci). Il secondo è che nel microcredito il punto di forza e allo stesso tempo il punto dolente sono i servizi ausiliari: le persone non bancabili hanno bisogno di essere aiutate nella valutazione della loro idea imprenditoriale, però, nessuno sa come poter qualificare “specializzati” gli incaricati di svolgere i servizi ausiliari di assistenza e monitoraggio. Pertanto occorrerebbe intervenire quanto prima per individuare il limite minimo di tali servizi e circostanziare tali figure professionali, disciplinando le modalità per la loro selezione. Il Dott. Stefano Cocchieri ha rappresentato come l’Unicredit stia attendendo che gli operatori di microcredito iscritti nell’albo unico ex art.111 TUB diventino operativi sul mercato perché a differenza delle banche possono erogare microcredito senza compiere una valutazione del merito creditizio e garantendo l’effettivo l’espletamento dei servizi ausiliari. Nell’attesa, in qualità di primo gruppo bancario che ha risposto al microcredito, l’Unicredit, nella persona del suo amministratore delegato, sta analizzando la propria situazione interna in merito al microcredito per valutare la possibilità di svolgere sia attività di service sia di erogazione del microcredito, anche tramite la possibile realizzazione di una branche appositamente dedicata. Il Dott. Diego Rizzato ha evidenziato, invece, come nell’attesa della normativa per iscriversi nell’albo ex art. 111 TUB il legislatore ha autorizzato le banche a potersi garantire sul Fondo per le PMI per le operazioni di microcredito e che oggi che il vuoto normativo è stato colmato, gli operatori di microcredito si trovano a dover concorrere in materia con le banche, che sono soggetti indubbiamente più strutturati e con maggiore capacità di funding. Il Dott. Rizzato auspica che il microcredito possa quanto prima valorizzare le soft informations del cliente e l’idea imprenditoriale e che si lasci maggior spazio ai 111 TUB che hanno vincoli regolamentari meno rigidi. Le sue proposte sono di semplificare il funding per i 111 TUB e ridurre il suo costo anche chiamando in causa Cassa Depositi e Prestiti, gli enti previdenziali e le fondazioni bancarie. Il Dott. Rizzato propone una forma di collaborazione tra le banche e i 111 TUB che possa consentire una più elevata qualità del microcredito erogato alle imprese. In ultimo è intervenuto il Dott. Andrea Nardone che ha osservato come il microcredito che è uno strumento di inclusione, viene trattato, invece, dal legislatore come uno strumento finanziario. Il Dott. Nardone ipotizza l’intervento di altri Ministeri, come ad esempio quello del Lavoro e delle Politiche Sociali per rendere più solido il microcredito e suggerisce di prendere spunto dal modello di erogazione del microcredito adottato in Francia dove, grazie ai contributi pubblici e privati, si sostengono le spese per le pratiche di microcredito. Ha messo in evidenza, invece, come sia un controsenso che in Italia il costo dei servizi ausiliari sia addebitato ai richiedenti.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

TITOLO DEL WORKSHOP: Innovazione sociale e Impact Investing

COORDINATORE: Leo Cisotta - ItaliaCamp
RELATORI: Federico Merola - AD Arpinge SpA Matteo Caroli - Direttore LUISS CERIIS Giovanni Formiglio - Agenzia del Demanio

Sintesi Il workshop ha affrontato le tematiche e le connessioni esistenti tra Innovazione Sociale e Impact Investing, declinando la finanza d’impatto come “prodotto” innovativo di un approccio sociale alla crescita e allo sviluppo. Gli interventi dei discussant coinvolti si sono concentrati sulla definizione e sulla convergenza di specifici mega trends che stanno trasformando i paradigmi dell’intervento sociale: dall’abbandono di politiche di welfare nei paesi sviluppati, alla “commoditizzazione” delle tecnologie in risposta ai bisogni e alle nuove sfide emergenti della società. Appare quindi agevole individuare una finestra di opportunità e di trasformazioni per l’ecosistema dell’innovazione sociale nel suo complesso, per il public procurement e le istituzioni filantropiche, per le società profit e non profit, per gli imprenditori sociali e gli investitori d’impatto e per tutti i diversi attori che fanno parte di questo ecosistema, insieme a quanti non sono ancora noti, ma che emergeranno nel prossimo futuro. A tal proposito, sono stati presentati al tavolo alcuni dei modelli emergenti di domanda di innovazione di impatto in diversi settori e in particolare energia e ambiente in Arpinge, beni pubblici e loro riuso per l’Agenzia del Demanio. Alla base di questa scelta c’è l’intuizione che prima di mettere a punto l’infrastruttura finanziaria che dovrebbe assistere l’approvvigionamento di capitale, sarà necessario nutrire l’emergere di iniziative consistenti, innovative e forti dal lato della domanda. L’esistenza di una domanda potenziale è un prerequisito che deve sussistere prima di poter strutturare qualsiasi iniziativa sul lato dell’offerta, ha spiegato il Direttore del CERIIS, centro di ricerca già impegnato nello studio dei modelli di business emergenti in ambito sociale. La quantificazione di questo potenziale d’investimento è un processo a due step (di cui, il secondo, sarà oggetto di studi futuri). Il primo - oggetto dell’intervento - consiste nell’identificazione di uno strato intermedio di nuovi modelli di social business che rappresentano, da un lato, l’evoluzione di modelli esistenti di intervento sociale e dall’altro, si caratterizzano per una soddisfacente struttura che li pone all’attenzione di potenziali investitori, o, per essere più espliciti, diventano soggetti investibili. Sono questi gli argomenti a supporto di una filosofia innovativa che intende approcciare ogni forma di investimento dotandosi degli strumenti – di misurazione e di monitoraggio – per calcolare gli impatti sociali, occupazionali, ambientali che intende o vuole tendere a produrre sulle comunità alle quali si rivolge e/o presso cui opera. I nuovi modelli emergenti di impresa sono stati declinati da ItaliaCamp in tre privilegiati settori di intervento: welfare e salute, energia ed educazione. L’uso pratico di questo set di modelli serve come strumento di screening per un ulteriore selezione e quantificazione dell’attuale potenziale domanda di impact investing nel nostro Paese. Come emerso nel corso del workshop, le principali dimensioni per il Social Impact Assessment sono state identificate sulla base di uno studio di J. P. Morgan, che individua le categorie di maggior interesse per gli investitori ad impatto sociale. Oltre alle diverse aree di applicazione, lo studio ha indagato e messo a fuoco come e quanto l’uso di tecnologie per rilevare, aggregare e quindi risolvere i problemi sociali ha innescato la creazione di nuovi modelli economici. Alcuni di questi, come ad esempio il paradigma della sharing economy, si basano principalmente sull’uso della tecnologia per coinvolgere i cittadini e sviluppare le loro capacità nel fornire soluzioni ai propri bisogni sociali. I concetti di missione sociale, tecnologia intesa come mezzo e cittadini come innovatori, sembrano in linea con l’idea di Smart Community. L’applicazione di questo nuovo approccio ai diversi aspetti dell’urbanistica, così come del non urbano e della vita in generale, potrebbe produrre soluzioni nuove e maggiormente efficienti. L’Impact Investing intende dunque superare il concetto dell’investimento socialmente responsabile (SRI) (utilizzato dagli investitori per evitare di investire in società che non si adeguano ai propri obiettivi sociali). L’investimento ambientale, sociale e/o di governance (ESG) è una nuova declinazione dello stesso concetto per sostenere l’investimento sociale che tiene conto anche del fatto che le aziende non possono più contare sulla Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) per adempiere al loro ruolo nella comunità. In questo senso, stanno ragionando anche le Fondazioni (bancarie e non) impegnate già da qualche tempo a superare il modello classico di supporto ai territori e che investono in progettualità in logica impact puntando a un uso più orientato dei capitali e depl atrimonio. Infine, il workshop ha affrontato il tema delle novità normative di derivazione comunitaria, che intercettano la tendenza in atto di reinterpretare il ruolo sociale delle grandi imprese con una lente diversa. La direttiva europea 2014/95/UE del 22/10/2014 infatti, impone dal prossimo anno a tutte le aziende di grandi dimensioni l’obbligo di dotarsi di strumenti propri in grado di fornire informazioni di carattere non finanziario al mercato. Il riconoscimento dell’importanza dei fattori sociali e di contesto (sull’impatto attuale e prevedibile dell’impresa, sulla salute e sulla sicurezza, sul dialogo sociale e con le comunità locali), delle esternalità ambientali (utilizzo di risorse energetiche rinnovabili e/o non rinnovabili, impiego di risorse pubbliche), dell’attenzione agli strumenti di welfare è molto probabilmente il primo passo verso la costruzione di una coscienza critica comune in grado di orientare attivamente gli interessi della società verso una ripresa sostenibile e inclusiva.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Sottocategorie

© 2019 Rivista Microfinanza. All Rights Reserved.